European Tropical Forest Research Network

Established in 1991, the European Tropical Forest Research Network (ETFRN) aims to ensure that European research contributes to conservation and sustainable use of forest and tree resources in tropical and subtropical countries.

Publications

Local land-use plans, bylaws and conventions reduce resource-based conflicts

Burkina Faso and Niger face rapid population growth, climate change, armed insecurity and conflicts over resources. In response, the National Cooperative Business Association CLUSA International (NCBA CLUSA) implemented the Resilience and Economic Grown in the Sahel – Enhanced Resilience (REGIS-ER) project. This article presents the approach, impacts and factors of success of the REGIS-ER project.


This article was submitted for inclusion in the forthcoming edition of ETFRN News 60 - Restoring African drylands, due for release in December 2020, containing 25 articles plus interviews and boxes describing farmer-led, NGO, private sector, government and international initiatives. These highlight the roles of varied policies and stakeholder interests, and identify opportunities to encourage smallholder and community participation in scaling out successes and meeting national, regional and global commitments.

 

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Restoring grasslands in Kenya’s drylands

 Based in the lowlands of Baringo County in Kenya’s rift valley, RAE (Rehabilitating Arid Environments) Ltd. has worked for 38 years to develop a successful socio-ecological model that benefits people and dryland environments. RAE adapts its rain-fed land restoration techniques to each site, while continually revising its activities and strategies to the changing environmental and social dynamics of different areas and communities. This articles presentes the approach, methods, benefits, impacts and ways forward of RAE.

 

This article was submitted for inclusion in the forthcoming edition of ETFRN News 60 - Restoring African drylands, due for release in December 2020, containing 25 articles plus interviews and boxes describing farmer-led, NGO, private sector, government and international initiatives. These highlight the roles of varied policies and stakeholder interests, and identify opportunities to encourage smallholder and community participation in scaling out successes and meeting national, regional and global commitments.

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Forest and farm producer organizations in Ghana’s drylands: key partners in restoration

Building on existing experiences, interviews and local surveys in Ghana’s savannah zone, this article details how FFPOs can help build climate-resilient landscapes and ensure that multiple benefits are generated for local communities. It highlights how FFPOs that implement restoration can build strong and sustainable value chains, and promote integrated production and climate-resilient landscapes. With FFPOs driving the process, restoration can become a vehicle for creating a new natural resource asset base in rural areas.

 

This article was submitted for inclusion in the forthcoming edition of ETFRN News 60 - Restoring African drylands, due for release in December 2020, containing 25 articles plus interviews and boxes describing farmer-led, NGO, private sector, government and international initiatives. These highlight the roles of varied policies and stakeholder interests, and identify opportunities to encourage smallholder and community participation in scaling out successes and meeting national, regional and global commitments.

 

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Regreening Africa: A bottom-up transformation of degraded lands

This article presents the programme Regreening Africa, a five-year programme (2017–22) funded by the EU that aims to restore one million hectares and contribute to the livelihoods of 500,000 smallholder farmers across eight African countries; Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal and Somalia. It addresses key aspects of land degradation in agricultural lands, such as soil erosion and declining soil fertility, low agricultural productivity, overgrazing and deforestation. It also supports the development of tree-based value chains.


This article was submitted for inclusion in the forthcoming edition of ETFRN News 60 - Restoring African drylands, due for release in December 2020, containing 25 articles plus interviews and boxes describing farmer-led, NGO, private sector, government and international initiatives. These highlight the roles of varied policies and stakeholder interests, and identify opportunities to encourage smallholder and community participation in scaling out successes and meeting national, regional and global commitments.

 

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Enhancing women’s rights and lives through gender-equitable restoration in Burkina Faso

In Burkina Faso and elsewhere in West Africa, women’s limited access to and control over land severely hinders their ability to engage in restoration activities. This article specifically addresses three questions: What motivates women to invest time and effort in the restoration of land and forests? What obstacles do women face in implementing land and forest restoration activities? How do restoration activities affect the living conditions of women?

This article was submitted for inclusion in the forthcoming edition of ETFRN News 60 - Restoring African drylands, due for release in December 2020, containing 25 articles plus interviews and boxes describing farmer-led, NGO, private sector, government and international initiatives. These highlight the roles of varied policies and stakeholder interests, and identify opportunities to encourage smallholder and community participation in scaling out successes and meeting national, regional and global commitments.

 

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Using market incentives to drive regreening: the case of Sahara Sahel Foods

In Niger, since the droughts of the 1970s and 1980s, one of the most successful land restoration strategies has been the regeneration of native trees in farmers’ fields. This has led to a reduction in soil erosion and an improvement in soil fertility. But the focus has often been on the positive effects of trees on annual crop yields, missing the other direct benefits that trees provide. The most valuable of these benefits is the potential contribution of trees as food sources. Wild food trees are productive as well as resilient to drought and very nutritious. Readopting their consumption on a large scale could be game-changing to the Sahel: it would catalyse their propagation, bring better food security and nutrition, counter desertification, sequester carbon and sustain biodiversity. The founders of Sahara Sahel Foods felt that in order to bring forth such a revolution, an inclusive food processing industry should be created to serve as a stable outlet for produce harvested by rural communities from their surviving and regenerating trees. This article presents the case of Sahara Sahel Foods, there beginnings, challenges, lessons learned and way forward.

This article was submitted for inclusion in the forthcoming edition of ETFRN News 60 - Restoring African drylands, due for release in December 2020, containing 25 articles plus interviews and boxes describing farmer-led, NGO, private sector, government and international initiatives. These highlight the roles of varied policies and stakeholder interests, and identify opportunities to encourage smallholder and community participation in scaling out successes and meeting national, regional and global commitments.

 

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Latest news

Release of the first articles on restoring African drylands

11-09-20

Drylands occupy more than a third of all the world’s land, most now degraded or severely degraded. Drylands are also home to an equivalent proportion of humanity, and a disproportionate number of the world’s poorest people. But with the right support, they is also much potential to rapidly reduce poverty, increase ecological and economic resilience, and climate change mitigation through soil carbon sequestration.

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Latest ETFRN news: Zero deforestation: A commitment to change

08-06-17

Several hundred companies, governments, and civil society and non-governmental organizations have committed to zero deforestation initiatives. However, all may not have fully realized the enormousness and complexity of the challenge in committing to zero deforestation, and it appears that some did not know exactly what they stepped into. What is clear though, is that this endeavour is very much at the initial stage of development, and early work and experimentation is showing the way to putting in place what is needed.

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